September 24, 2012

Cool Down Cubes

 
I have several students on my caseload who struggle with anger management and emotional regulation. I loved this idea for Cool Down Cubes from Entirely Elementary and decided to make a set of my own.

Supplies:
Plastic ice cubes - I purchased a bag of 30 from Bed Bath & Beyond for less than $4
Container - The one pictured came from the Dollar Store
Permanent maker


Using a permanent marker write a safe "cool down" strategy on each ice cube. For example: count to ten, walk away, talk to a friend, take three deep breaths, etc. I also left a few of the cubes blank so that the students could come up with their own strategies. The original post suggested placing the ice cubes in the freezer for an additional "cool" effect. That's it! Easy right?

 
I have used the Cool Down Cubes in both individual and group settings to discuss ways to "cool-off" when angry and have gotten a great response from students. 



34 comments:

  1. OMG I totally love this!!! I have kids that struggle with this too. I am sooo making these this weekend!
    Mels
    Ms. K/1 ELL

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  2. going to try this. I have a 4 yr old autistic son who struggles a lot with anger no matter when the activity changes.

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    1. I don't know if This will work for you but my mom has found it incredibly helpful when working with my younger brother who is autistic. When an activity change is predictable, she tells him in "X" minutes we're going to ____, I'm going to set a timer, when it goes off we're going to ____. Then reiterates every couple of minute or so until the timer goes off. "We have four minutes left." She thinks it helps because it gives him brain time to process the change and makes the timer the enforcer instead of her.

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    2. Good idea for any child. Helps them learn to anticipate and measure time. As a regular ed. teacher, parent of three and grandma of three I've learned that we all like/need routines and don't like change.

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    3. The timer works especially with young children. They watch the timer (not me) and know it's the true time and is "neutral." I also reminded them what we were going to do next after the timer went off,.

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    4. I have a daughter who's disability was that time did not pass for her like us. They had us use a clock on the stove to give her a visual of time passing. It made getting ready in the morning so much easier. She had a list of everstep she needed to do to be ready for the day. She had to watch the clock and complete her tasks before the time ran out. This kept her moving along the list. The visual timer was a great. I can totally see it helping with changing from task to task.

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    5. I have a daughter who's disability was that time did not pass for her like us. They had us use a clock on the stove to give her a visual of time passing. It made getting ready in the morning so much easier. She had a list of everstep she needed to do to be ready for the day. She had to watch the clock and complete her tasks before the time ran out. This kept her moving along the list. The visual timer was a great. I can totally see it helping with changing from task to task.

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    6. My son is autistic and a visual schedule that he can see helps alot. I use the alarm on my phone to keep him on track, but I have learned that he responds better to concrete times and processes rather than winging it and giving him options. Also, talking about what's going to happen the following day helps him focus on the goals for the day from the moment he wakes up. Hope this helps. Things will get better, my son started talking at 4 and is highly verbal now at age 6. Be brave. Good luck will find you.

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    7. I wished I knew this when my son was young...He had such a problem with that....we went to so many doctors and we still have problems at 22!

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  3. Fantastic idea. I will use this for them and even me

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  4. "Cool" idea! Thanks for sharing!

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  5. Thanks. This is a great idea. I have added a link to it in my Emotional Intelligence Dashboard.

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  6. Thanks for the idea. I will use it :-)

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  7. Thank you for a great strategy! Cannot wait to use it!

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  8. Thanks for sharing this awesome idea can't wait to start using it in a classroom.

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  9. What a GREAT idea! I have two ED students this year who struggle with their temper. This will be a great resource for them! Thanks for sharing :)

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  10. Wonderful idea! may i ask how you use it in practice? Does the teacher take the container to the student who looks like they may need it, do the students go to the container on the teachers desk, or do students with tempers have an individual one on their desk?
    I love the idea and I am wondering how best to implement.
    Thank you - Tim

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  11. I might use these at home for my son...

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  12. Hi
    I do teacher training workshops. I am writing to ask permission to use the photo of the cool down ice cubes in a Power Point Presentation. I will credit your site and provide your URL.
    Please respond to: epostman3@cox.net and put cool-down ice cubes in the subject line.

    I look forward to hearing from you.

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  13. I have another suggestion: a visual cue, or reminder of sorts. My son is on the spectrum and I use verbal cues for transitioning. It was suggested to me, for use in class, to use visual cues. Perhaps a block with YELLOW, RED, AND GREEN. To signal that an activity is soon coming to an end. And another color to signal another few minutes, etc. - - -I do like the use of the ice cubes since my goal is to get him to better express and therefore manage his emotions at that moment. Thank You.

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  14. May I add this to my blog, giving you all the credit, of course? patriciadorsey.wordpress.com

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  15. I am doing this for 3 students in my class who struggle with the same thing. Thanks for sharing this looks awesome!!

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  16. Can you share the strategies that you have written on the cubes? I love this idea and would like to make one for my social skill groups.

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  17. My son has a card system for the classroom and holds them up when needed... a yellow card for a quick break (toilet etc), orange for when he can feel a meltdown approaching and wants time out to calm down and ward it off, and red for when the outburst is happening in a few seconds.

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  18. My son has a card system for the classroom and holds them up when needed... a yellow card for a quick break (toilet etc), orange for when he can feel a meltdown approaching and wants time out to calm down and ward it off, and red for when the outburst is happening in a few seconds.

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  19. Has this been helpful when working with 4 year olds?

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  20. Adults too....this is a method for people with borderline personality disorder

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  21. Frightening. My daughter and I have Raynaud's. This would make us cry in pain within seconds.

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  22. Love it, I think I'll use it and share with teachers!

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  23. Nice post, do you feel Ice Flake Machine far more better to produce ice cubes?

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  24. Excellent post. Security Blog Melbourne gives complete end-to-end advancement and foundation benefits through totally approved specialists and experienced program and improvement heads.

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  25. really awesome post, can you share some post about Ice Cube machine , Thanks.!!

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